Ways to view stocks and the stock market in ShareAnalysis

ShareAnalysis’s unique views of the stock market makes it easy to spot top stocks and avoid wealth-destroying companies.

Stock List

The Stock List is a traditional way of viewing and comparing key ratios for companies. ShareAnalysis’s Stock List can be customised to suit how you like to invest.

Edit the columns you see and focus in on growth, yield, value and other key economic ratios. Learn more about the Stock List.

The Stock List is a traditional way of viewing and comparing key ratios for companies

Aerial View

ShareAnalysis’s Aerial Views – the unique splatter of colour ShareAnalysis is renowned for – is a powerful tool that you can use to understand the overall quality of the stock market and identify growth, yield and value stocks. Learn more about the Aerial Views.

Aerial views

ASX 200 (Australia only)

ShareAnalysis’s ASX 200 ShareAnalysis Line plots the ASX/S&P 200 Index Price against ShareAnalysis’s combined valuation for the 200 largest companies listed on the ASX.

The chart is a visual interpretation of ShareAnalysis’s opinion of the relative value of the Australian market and can be used to gauge if the stock market, in aggregate, is overpriced or value-for-money. Learn more about the ASX 200.

ASX 200

See your personal view of the stock market

Check out the stocks in your portfolio and reduce the stock market to companies that meet your investment criteria.

Sometimes you just want to look at a particular group of your favourite stocks, or the companies in your portfolio.

With your portfolio in ShareAnalysis, and a selection of filters saved, checking out the latest research for stocks on your radar is easy.

Check out the stocks in your portfolio and reduce the stock market to companies that meet your investment criteria.

Here are the filter options you can choose from.

All

See every stock covered by ShareAnalysis

Analyst coverage

ShareAnalysis sources consensus analyst earnings, dividends, equity and profit forecasts for thousands of companies.

This filter will reveal all stocks with analyst coverage.

Top 50 (Market Cap)

Use this filter if you’re only interested in the 50 largest stocks by market capitalisation.

Preset Filters

Quality and Growth

Check out A1 – B2 rated stocks with acceptable debt and positive forecast future growth.

Quality and Yield

This filter isolates profitable companies that have a strong track record, and are forecast to continue paying affordable and sustainable dividends.

Speculative

Stocks that meet this filter have high-risk balance sheets (their ShareAnalysis Quality Score is ‘C’), but demonstrated good or excellent business performance. Adding net debt/equity to the filter helps to further avoid the extreme high-risk businesses. Analyst forecasts may or may not be available for stocks that meet the speculative filter.

Portfolios

Check out the stocks in one of your portfolios or watchlists.

Customise how you see a list of stocks

Review the financial ratios that are important to you when evaluating and comparing stocks and making investment decisions.

Your financial goals will determine the economic ratios you choose to see in ShareAnalysis’s Stock List.

To change the ratios you see, click the ‘Edit columns’ button. Click an option to select or deselect it. When you’re done, click ‘Save columns’.

Here are the options you can choose from, what types of stocks they’re useful to find and also ShareAnalysis’s preferred criteria.

Your financial goals will determine the economic ratios you choose to see in Share Analysis’s Stock List.

 

Key Info

NameWhat it isUseful to find…ShareAnalysis prefers
Company Name

Company Name

The registered name of the company.

A particular companyN/A
Stock Code

Code

The company’s stock/ticker code.

A particular companyN/A
Market Capitalisation

Market Capitalisation

The current market price multiplied by the number of shares outstanding. The market value of the company.

Large stocks or small stocks, depending on your preference.N/A
Share pricePrice The previous day’s closing price.N/AN/A
Sector

Sector

The industry sector in which the company operates.

Companies in specific sectors (and sectors to avoid).N/A
Industry

Industry

The group, within the sector, in which the company operates.

Companies operating in particular industries.N/A
Last full year report

Last Full Year Report

Date of the company’s most recent full year financial results.

When the company last reported their full year results.The more recent, the more up-to-date the historical financial information.

Forecast metrics

NameWhat it isUseful to find…ShareAnalysis prefers
Safety Margin

Safety Margin

The difference between ShareAnalysis’s current intrinsic value and the market price.

Value stocksPositive safety margin
ForecastP/E

Forecast P/E

Current market price divided by forecast earnings per share. Represents how much investors are paying for $1 of the company’s earnings.

Value stocksLower number
Forecast PEG

Forecast PEG Ratio

Calculated as Forecast P/E divided by Forecast EPS Growth. High growth companies generally trade on high P/E ratios. The PEG indicates whether a high P/E is justified by the forecast EPS growth.

Value stocks< 1
Forecast Dividend Yield

Forecast Dividend Yield

Forecast dividends per share as a percentage of the current market price.

Income stocksHigher percentage
Forecast ROE

Forecast Return on Equity

Measures the forecast profitability of a company by comparing how many dollars were required to produce the reported profit.

Profitable stocks> 10%
Analyst Coverage

Analyst Coverage

Number of analysts contributing forecasts.

Companies with more research available.>1
Forecast Valuation Age (days)

Forecast Valuation Age (days)

The number of days since the company’s Earnings Per Share (EPS) forecast was updated.

Stocks with the latest forecast data.Less days

Forecast metrics – trends

NameWhat it isUseful to find…ShareAnalysis prefers
Forecast Change in Value

Forecast Change in Value

Per annum increase or decrease in value over the forecast period.

Growth stocks> 10%
Forecast EPS Growth

Forecast EPS Growth

Percentage change from the most recent historical EPS to its forecast EPS.

Growth stocksHigher number

Historical metrics

NameWhat it isUseful to find…ShareAnalysis prefers
Share Analysis Score

Mainstreet Score

A1 – C5 company rating of balance sheet quality and economic performance.

High quality and top performing companies.A1, A2, B1, B2
Historical Change in Value

Historical Change in Value

Per annum increase or decrease in value over the historical period.

Companies that have a demonstrated track record of growth.> 10%
Return on Equity

Return on Equity

Measures the profitability of a company by comparing how many dollars were required to produce the reported profit.

Profitable stocks, historically> 10%
Net Debt / Equity

Net Debt / Equity

Represents debt (less any cash on a company’s balance sheet) as a percentage of the total equity in the business. It measures the financial leverage of a company.

Companies with little or no debt (aka strong balance sheets).< 40%
PPE / Total Assets

PPE / Total Assets

Measures the company’s Property, Plant and Equipment assets as a percentage of the total assets of the business. PPE / Total Assets is one measure of the capital intensity of a company’s business. Companies with lower relative levels of property, plant and equipment require less cash reinvested to remain competitive.

Stocks that are not capital intensive.< 30%
Cash Interest Cover

Cash Interest Cover

Represents the amount of times a company’s interest bill is covered by its cash flow.

Companies with money for a rainy day.> 4
Cash Flow Ratio - current

Cash Flow Ratio (current)

Measures the quality of a company’s earnings by comparing earnings to cash flow, for the recent historical year.Companies with a higher proportion of cash earnings produce a higher Cash Flow Ratio.

Cash cows. The more cash a company produces, the better.> 0.8
Cash Flow Ratio (total)

Cash Flow Ratio (total)

Measures the quality of a company’s earnings by comparing earnings to cash flow, over the total historical period. Companies with a higher proportion of cash earnings produce a higher Cash Flow Ratio.

Cash cows. The more cash a company produces, the better.> 0.8
Funding Surplus (current)

Funding Surplus (current)

Calculated by subtracting the capital expenditure, investments and dividends paid from the company’s Cash Flow Generated From Operations, for the recent historical year.

Companies that spend less money than they earn.$0
Funding Surplus (total)

Funding Surplus (total)

Calculated by subtracting the capital expenditure, investments and dividends paid from the company’s Cash Flow Generated From Operations, over the total historical period.

Companies that consistently spend less money than they earn.> $0
P/E

P/E

Recent historical EPS as a percentage of the year end market price. Represents how much investors were willing to pay for $1 of the company’s earnings.

Value stocks, historicallyLower number
Historical Dividend Yield

Dividend Yield

Measures Dividends Per Share as a percentage of the Market Price. Is the current market price divided by recent historical DPS.

Yield stocksHigher percentage
Sonkin PE Ratio

Sonkin Ratio

An alternative to the P/E ratio and represents the value of the business including both equity and debt interests against the operating earnings before interest but after tax. A lower multiple means an investor will pay less to own the after-tax operating earnings of the business.

Value stocksLow number
Graham Nett

Graham Nett

Calculated by deducting the company’s total liabilities from a discounted measure of its current assets, compared to its Market Capitalisation. Graham Nett identifies stocks that are trading at a discount to their liquidation value, that is, really cheap.

Value stocks>1

Historical metrics – banks

NameWhat it isUseful to find…ShareAnalysis prefers
Return on Assets

Return on Assets

An efficiency measure for banks. The higher the ratio the more profitable the bank’s assets.

Banks with profitable assets.> 0.8%
Net Interest Margin

Net Interest Margin

The interest income from the bank’s loan book, less interest paid out to depositors. The higher the ratio, the more efficient the bank.

Efficient banks> 1.8%
Cost To Income Ratio

Cost To Income Ratio

An efficiency ratio that compares a bank’s operating expenses to its total income. A low ratio indicates the bank is controlling its costs.

Banks with good cost control.< 50%
Change in Bad Debts

Change in Bad Debts

Measures a banks provisioning. ShareAnalysis looks at the change in bad debts over the past two years. Low or negative changes indicate higher-quality borrowers, improved lending practices or improving economic conditions.

Banks with high quality earnings< 0%

Historical metrics – insurance

NameWhat it isUseful to find…ShareAnalysis prefers
Combined Ratio

Combined Ratio

A performance measure for insurance companies that compares the sum of claims, commissions and expenses against the premiums written. The lower the Combined Ratio the higher the profit margin of the company’s insurance business.

High profit margin insurance businesses.< 95%

ShareAnalysis’s Aerial Views of the stock market

Use ShareAnalysis’s Aerial Views to find the best growth, yield and value stocks.

ShareAnalysis’s Aerial Views – the unique splatter of colour ShareAnalysis is renowned for – is a powerful tool that you can use to understand the overall quality of the stock market and identify growth, yield and value stocks.

Colour represents the company’s ShareAnalysis Score for balance sheet quality and business performance: green is good, orange is average and red is poor.

You can choose from ShareAnalysis’s in-built views, or use the axis selector to build your own.

Market Capitalisation vs Growth

Useful to find: Growth stocks

What to look for: The highest growth stocks are at the top, and the largest stocks by market cap to the right.

Market Capitalisation vs Growth

Market Capitalisation vs Dividend Yield

Useful to find: Yield stocks

What to look for: The highest yield stocks are at the top, and the largest stocks by market cap to the right.

Market Capitalisation vs Dividend Yield

Quality vs Safety Margin

Useful to find: High quality value stocks

What to look for: The highest quality (A-rated) stocks are on the right, and the best value stocks at the top.

Quality vs Safety Margin

Create your own view

Create your own view to find stocks that meet your investment criteria.

Here are a few interesting combinations to try out. Stocks in the top right corner of the screen represent the best of both axis criteria.

Vertical Axis

Horizontal Axis

Use it to find…

Forecast Change in Value

Forecast Dividend Yield

Growth stocks that also offer an attractive yield

Forecast Change in Value

Quality

Top quality growth stocks

Forecast Dividend Yield

Quality

Top quality yield stocks

Safety Margin

Forecast Change in Value

High growth value stocks

Is the ASX 200 overpriced, fair value or cheap?

The ASX 200 chart plots the ASX/S&P 200 Index Price against ShareAnalysis’s aggregated valuations for Australia’s 200 largest stocks.

The ASX 200 chart can be used to gauge if the market, in aggregate, is overpriced or value-for-money.

The chart plots two valuations – High and Low. High is a more optimistic estimate of value, whilst low is more conservative.

The ASX 200 chart plots the ASX/S&P 200 Index Price against Share Analysis's aggregated valuations for Australia’s 200 largest stocks.

The difference between High and Low is the result of the Required Return used in the valuation formula. Required Return, also known as the discount rate or expected return, reflects the risk premium of a company, or in this case Index, and is a key input into ShareAnalysis’s intrinsic valuation formula.

Required return should take into account:

• Real rate of return. What return did an investor actually receive? For example, in the 22 years from 1980 to 2002, global output grew at a rate of 3.2 per cent.

• Inflation. Over the past 100 years inflation has averaged between 3 and 5 per cent.

• Equity risk premium. This refers to the compensation for risk. What return do you want for the risk of investing your money in a listed business?

When the ASX 200 Index Price is less than both the High and Low valuations the chart is green. During this period the stock market may be considered bearish, with many sellers.

An orange chart indicates the ASX 200 Index price is less than ShareAnalysis’s High valuation, but higher than the Low valuation. At this time ShareAnalysis considers the stock market to be neither value-for-money nor expensive.

When the Index Price is higher than both valuations the ASX 200 chart is red. This generally indicates the stock market is bullish, share prices are generally rising and investors are optimistic about the future.